Covid-19 Update

on Tuesday, 24 March 2020.

We Are Open - With a Few Changes!

nursery smShooting Star Nursery is committed to doing everything we can to keep our staff, our customers, and our community safe and healthy during the Covid-19 outbreak. As a result, we are making the following changes to the ways we serve our customers, effective immediately.

          Online orders are the best way for us to get our plants to you! You can check our retail availability on our website, email your order to us (please include a phone number where we can reach you), and we’ll call you to get your credit card number and confirm your order. We will then pull your plants and have them ready for you to pick up, along with a copy of your receipt.

          We can deliver! We offer free delivery for orders of $100 or more that are within 10 miles of our nursery. Our normal delivery charges will apply to any extra-large plants (requiring multiple staff) or locations that are more than 10 miles from Shooting Star. Delivery times will be subject to our nursery schedule, and we are unable to promise specific times/days.          

          At this time, onsite shopping is by appointment only. We are unable to accommodate drop-in shoppers. To set up an appointment, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or give us a call at (541) 840-6453. Please note that it may take us awhile to get back to you if you call. Email is probably best if you are hoping for a quicker response.

          We will keep everyone updated on any changes via social media. If you don’t already follow us on Facebook or Instagram, please consider doing so!

          You can purchase a gift certificate for a friend, family member, or yourself to use at a later, healthier date. We are offering $15 off every $100 in gift certificates purchased during this quarantine time.

We do ask that you stay home if you are sick, and to please help us observe the 6-foot social distancing recommendation at all times. No customers are allowed in the nursery office at this time. Your cooperation is key to our being able to remain open!

Thank you all so much for your patience and flexibility during these challenging times. By making these temporary changes, we will still be able to keep you supplied with beautiful, healthy, and hardy plants to brighten your yards – and your hearts – as you remain at home to help “flatten the curve.” This is definitely not the spring any of us wanted – but on the bright side, it does give you a great excuse to spend more time outside in your garden.

From all of us here at Shooting Star – be well!

The Fruits of Persia

on Thursday, 28 November 2019. Posted in Edibles, Fruit trees

Delicious Additions to Your Edible Landscape!

What do figs, pomegranates, persimmons, almonds, peaches, apricots, and grapes all have in common (aside from being delicious)? They’re part of a group we like to think of as “the Fruits of Persia’, as they all originated in the Fertile Crescent region and figure prominently in Persian cuisine.

The Rogue Valley shares several similarities with the climate of Persia: Hot summer days and cooler nights, relatively low rainfall, a long enough heat spell in summer to ripen fruits, and ample chill hours in winter. Thus, it makes sense that many of our favorite fruits come from this rich and abundant area of the world. In fact, the word ‘paradise’ has a Persian root, meaning walled garden. This year, let’s create our own paradise of luscious fruits!
 
figsFigs
Love our hot summers
Very traditional in Persian and Mediterranean cuisine
Best flavor when picked very ripe and soft to the touch
Choose early ripening or two-crop varieties
Appreciate a well-drained soil
 
PomegranatePomegranates
Thought to be the ‘apple’ in the Adam and Eve story
Drought tolerant and very heat tolerant, grown as a large shrub to small tree
Like figs, locate in the hottest location you have and provide well-draining soil
Choose early ripening varieties
 
all in oneAlmonds
To avoid potential spring frost damage, choose a late blooming variety like ‘All in One’, which has the added benefits of being semi-dwarf and self-fertile
Encourage your pollinators by planting pollinator-friendly plants nearby. They’ll repay your efforts by improving pollination!
Well-draining soil is best but can tolerate some clay
 
suncrestPeaches
Nothing beats the taste of a sun warmed peach
Long history in Persian culture. In fact, the botanical name for peach is Prunus persica!
Lots of varieties so you can stretch out your peach harvest time
Look for disease resistant varieties to avoid Peach Leaf Curl, or use a dormant oil spray
Does best in a well-drained soil; all varieties are self-fertile!
 
apricotApricots
Early blooming like the Almonds. For best results, choose late blooming, self-fertile varieties like Harcot, Chinese, Moorpark, and Autumn Glo
Best flavor when picked ripe, and always better than store-bought!
Very traditional fruit in Persian cuisine: fresh, dried, and preserves
Like most fruit trees, Apricots do best in well-drained soil
 
GrapesGrapes
Love our hot summers; drought tolerant and fast growing
Very traditional in Persian and Mediterranean cuisine, leaves are culinary as well
Choose different varieties to enjoy contrasting flavors and colors and ripening times
Can tolerate different soils, but well-drained is best. Avoid overwatering
Maintain good air circulation and sun exposure to avoid mildew
 
fuyuPersimmons
Persimmons originally developed in China and Japan. However, the word “persimmon” likely come from a Persian word meaning date-plum: a nice description of the flavor!
Very ornamental tree with great fall color and decorative and edible sweet fruit
Best flavor when allowed to soften
One of the latest fruits to harvest, cold hardy to Zone 7 
Persimmons can handle clay soils better than most fruit trees
 

 

  

Fall Berries are for the Birds!

on Thursday, 10 October 2019.

Cedar waxwing

Not only do fall and winter berries add a splash of color to your yard during our gray Oregon winters, but they're also an important food source for many of our migrating and wintering songbirds - like robins, cedar waxwings (left), varied and hermit thrushes, spotted towhees, and Townsend's solitaires. Many berries are rich in fats, and help tide the birds through the cold weather when insect populations ( a favorite bird food!) decline. 

 

Kinnikinick

Native Plants:

Fall-fruiting native plants are at the top of the "favorites" list for our local birds - both as great food sources and for the shelter they provide. Natives also tend to be sturdy and low-maintenance; making them a welcome addition for most landscapes. Some of our favorites for the Rogue Valley and surrounding areas include: AmelanchierArctostaphylos, Mahonia, Myrica, Rhamnus, Rosa, Symphoricarpos, and Vaccinium ovatum (evergreen huckleberry). 

 

Non-Native Plants: 

Autumn oliveThere are also a number of hardy non-native shrubs and that are great winter food sources for  birds, and these plants also provide some nice visual interest for our fall and winter gardens. They include a number of plants already popular with local gardeners: Aronia, Autumn Olive (photo to left), Carnelian Cherry, Crabapple, Dogwood, Hawthorn, Holly, and Virginia Creeper.

Fall is a great time of year to add to your wildlife-friendly garden. The warm soil and cool air help your new plants get off to a great start - with roots having a chance to get established and grow out over the winter. And the overwintering birds in your yard will thank you!