Fall Berries are for the Birds!

on Thursday, 10 October 2019.

Cedar waxwing

Not only do fall and winter berries add a splash of color to your yard during our gray Oregon winters, but they're also an important food source for many of our migrating and wintering songbirds - like robins, cedar waxwings (left), varied and hermit thrushes, spotted towhees, and Townsend's solitaires. Many berries are rich in fats, and help tide the birds through the cold weather when insect populations ( a favorite bird food!) decline. 

 

Kinnikinick

Native Plants:

Fall-fruiting native plants are at the top of the "favorites" list for our local birds - both as great food sources and for the shelter they provide. Natives also tend to be sturdy and low-maintenance; making them a welcome addition for most landscapes. Some of our favorites for the Rogue Valley and surrounding areas include: Arctostaphylos, Mahonia, Myrica, Rhamnus, Rosa, Symphoricarpos, and Vaccinium ovatum (evergreen huckleberry). 

 

Non-Native Plants: 

Autumn oliveThere are also a number of hardy non-native shrubs and that are great winter food sources for  birds, and these plants also provide some nice visual interest for our fall and winter gardens. They include a number of plants already popular with local gardeners: Aronia, Autumn Olive (photo to left), Carnelian Cherry, Crabapple, Dogwood, Hawthorn, Holly, and Virginia Creeper.

Fall is a great time of year to add to your wildlife-friendly garden. The warm soil and cool air help your new plants get off to a great start - with roots having a chance to get established and grow out over the winter. And the overwintering birds in your yard will thank you! 

Ten Great Shade Trees for Fall Color

on Friday, 27 September 2019. Posted in Landscape contractor

These Trees Will Brighten Up Your Fall Yard

"The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second-best time is now." - Chinese Proverb

This is especially true if you're interested in finding a shade tree that also provides good fall color. The trees here at Shooting Star are just beginning to turn, so you can wander the nursery to soak up the fall color and make your selections. Here are ten of our favorite "fall color" trees to get you started - arranged in size from small to mid-sized to large. 

 

 Small Trees (under 30'):

Autumn brillianceAutumn Brilliance Serviceberry (20' x 15') - Serviceberries offer three-season interest in the garden: clouds of white flowers in the spring, blue-purple berries in the summer, and bright red leaves in the fall. 

Paperbark Maple (25' x 20') - Delicate-looking compound leaves turn red in the fall, shaggy exfoliating bark provides winter interest. A great maple selection for smaller spaces!

Vanessa Parrotia (28' x 14') - A small, upright tree that turns warm shades of orange and red. Great choice for small yards or as a street tree.

 

Medium-sized Trees (30-40'):

Native Flame Hornbeam (30' x 20') -  This heat-tolerant eastern native turns orange-red to bright red in fall, and the canopy has a nice oval shape.

Chinese Pistache

Chinese Pistache (30' x 30') - Chinese Pistache does beautifully in our hot, dry summers and turns a brilliant orange-red in fall.

 

Red Rage Tupelo (35' x 20') - Turns a glossy, copper-red - truly stunning. Tupelos are also tolerant of poorly drained soils.

 

Large Trees (40'+):

Autumn Purple Ash (45' x 40') -  Colors can vary each year from a yellow-orange to a deep purple. While the color can be changeable, the effect is always lovely.

Sun Valley Maple (40' x 35') -  A bright red seedless variety of Maple. 

Maple fall colorOctober Glory Maple (40' x 35') - The name says it all! This is the latest variety of maple to color up in fall, and can really help stretch out the fall display in your yard. Foliage ranges from deep red to red-purple.

Autumn Blaze Maple (50' x 40') - If you're in the market for a big, colorful shade tree, this is the one for you! Turns a brilliant shade of orange-red, and the color is fairly long-lasting. As an extra bonus, Autumn Blaze tends to be more drought tolerant than other maples.

 

 

 

 

Fall is the best time for planting

on Monday, 05 August 2019. Posted in Landscape contractor, Classes

Fallscaping- the benefits of fall planting

Fall is in the air.  It may not seem like it with the smoke and the temps still in the 90s.  But the days are getting shorter and we know that cooler temperatures and autumn rains are right around the corner.  

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You won't want to miss that prime opportunity to get planting.  Fall is the best time to plant in the Rogue Valley.  Especially higher investment plants like shade trees.  There is less stress involved when transplanting them during cool weather and when they have started to go dormant.  We like to define fall as when we start to get some rain, the days have cooled off and are shorter.  That can mean late September or early to mid October.  The Rogue Valley doesn't have the extreme winters of the east coast, so we can enjoy fall planting into November and December when trees and deciduous shrubs are fully dormant.  

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Top 5 Reasons for Planting in the Fall~

1.  Cool weather means less stress on the plants (and the gardeners!).

2.  The soil is still warm so root growth continues during the fall months; getting the plant better established for the following summer.

3.  You can plant more drought tolerant plants and have to water them less because they will be more established than a spring planting.  If we have a dry fall, you will still need to water deeply until the rain is more consistent.  

4. You can plant more natives and support wildlife and local habitat.  - Natives will have happier roots with a fall planting.

5.  The soil is easier to work with over the wet soils of spring.  So make the most of those crisp autumn days!

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The nursery has a whole series of fall classes to support you in your gardening endeavors.  We are fully stocked for fall, it won't be the dregs left over from summer.   Fall is a great time to add some color or texture to your garden.  Think ornamental grasses, seed heads, and crimson fall leaves.   If you think you need an expert eye on your landscape, contact us about our design and consult services.  Happy Planting!